What are the Duties of a family practitioner?

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The duties of a Family Practitioner (GP .. General Practitioner)
  • A GP is just that ... generalized practitioner.
  • Provides you with your yearly physical check-ups.
  • Sends you to the lab for urine samples or blood workup should you need them.
  • If the GP feels there is something wrong and doesn't quite know what it is that is causing your symptoms it's his/her responsibility to send you to an 'Internist' which studies the whole of the body. Once the Internist does tests on you and narrows down where your problem lies then the Internist will send you off to a specialist that works in that particular field.
  • If your GP sends you to a specialist it's up to him to be sure he/she works well with the specialist and has all paperwork re tests, etc., when he asks you in to discuss the findings of your tests. Your specialist will talk to you first, but you should feel free to discuss it further with your GP should you have any worries.
  • GP's also are affiliated with some hospitals and spend so much time a week going to these hospitals.
  • GP's should visit their elderly patients in hospital or nursing homes.
  • GP's are responsible for explaining the medications that they give their patients and the side effects that may occur from these medications and let you know what side effects warrant you coming in to him. If a patient is on a certain medication that requires blood workup every so often it's up to the GP to see that it is done.
  • GP's fill your prescriptions providing they were prescribed by your own GP.
  • GP's should have another doctor in their office if they plan on going on vacation and SHOULD tell their patients the name of that doctor and that he has every confidence in the doctor taking his place (to put the patient at rest.) Some patients refuse to see a different doctor, but in some cases they have no choice.
  • GP's are there to talk to women of all ages about birth control; premenopause or menopause and answer your questions as best they can. Some GP's will see a woman through her pregnancy (if there are no complications) and even deliver the baby. For men, they should be candid about low libido; aging; and be sure at a certain age his male patient gets tested yearly for prostate cancer.
  • GP's should be kind, considerate and treat their patients with dignity.
  • GP's should be kind, patient and write-out instructions for the elderly patient because they may be nervous or confused.
  • GP's are expected to make sure their patients are clear about any procedures they may have to go through such as certain tests or surgery and what the prognosis is.
There are a lot more duties in health care that GP's act on, but the list is too long. The long and short of it is that GP's are actually just as important as a specialist because it's the GP that has to decide where your problem is and what specialist you may have to see. GP's are part doctor, psychologist/psychiatrist (treating patients with anxiety and giving medication where needed.) Patients also have a responsibility to their doctor. They should write down their questions they want to ask the doctor and when making the appointment let the receptionist know that you have several questions and they will give you a little more time with the doctor. Be sure you write down the answers to your questions that the doctor takes the time to explain and if you don't understand what the doctor is explaining then say so. Patients should be candid with their doctor and never hold back their fears. The doctor can't help their patient without the true facts. Some fears are not warranted and the doctor can ease a patient's worries. When an elderly person comes in a daughter, son, relative or younger friend should accompany them to be sure that the elderly patient understands all the facts that the doctor is telling them or doses of medications that he may give that elderly patient. Patients should write down any genetic factors for the doctor such as if they have had childhood diseases; heart problems in the family; cancer, etc. The more information the patient gives their doctor the more their doctor can help them and know what signs to look for should that patient have a problem.
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What are the duties of a doctor who is a general family practitioner?

General practitioners and family physicians perform some or all of the following duties:. Examine patients and take their histories, order laboratory tests, X-rays and other diagnostic procedures and consult with other medical practitioners to evaluate patients' physical and mental health . Prescribe and administer medications and treatments . Perform and assist in routine surgery . Provide emergency care . Provide acute care management . Inoculate and vaccinate patients . Deliver babies and provide pre-natal and post-natal care . Advise patients and their families on health care including health promotion, disease, illness and accident prevention . Provide counselling and support to patients and their families on a wide range of health and lifestyle issues . Perform patient advocacy role . Co-ordinate or manage primary patient care . Provide continuous care to patients . Supervise home care services . Report births, deaths, and contagious and other diseases to governmental authorities.

What is a Nurse Practitioner?

A Nurse Practitioner receives an education and training at thegraduate level (Masters or higher). Nurse Practitioners can assess,diagnose, and treat a variety of medical problems. If you wish tobecome a Nurse Practitioner you must be a Registered Nurse beforeyou can apply. 18 states have granted Nurse Practitioners fullpractice authority and more have legislation pending. document health history and perform a physical exam plan a child's care with parents and the child's health careteam perform some tests and procedures answer questions about health problems treat common childhood illnesses assist with management of chronic illnesses change the plan of care with a child's doctor as needed teach families about the effects of illness on a child's growth and development teach kids about self-care and healthy lifestyle choices write prescriptions order medical tests teach other health care members and local groups about children'shealth care provide referrals to community groups

What does a nurse practitioner do?

A nurse practitioner is a health care provider that can diagnose, treat, and monitor various disease processes. In some states, they can prescribe narcotics as well. So far, there are only four states that still won't allow this component of practice. In some states, a NP must have a collaborative agreement with a MD, some may require direct supervision. Some NPs may have their own private practices without physician oversight at all. NPs can obtain privileges at hospitals so that they can round. Some states allow NPs to admit their own patients to hospitals. For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (Wikipedia) indicated directly below this answer section. The job of a nurse practitioner talks with you about symptoms and prescribes you medicine. itis different in that a nurse practitioner doesn't work for a doctor.

What is a General Practitioner?

A general practioner is a medical doctor who is a generalist (did not study a specialty during residency). Often referred to as a 'family doctor'.

What is the base salary of a family practitioner?

According to Salary.com the average salary of a family practitioner is $149,724. -Miran Dapag D.O.. According to Salary.com the average salary of a family practitioner is $149,724. -Miran Dapag D.O.

What is the difference between a family nurse practitioner and a pediatrician?

A nurse practitioner does not have M.D. (medical doctor) degree and does not have the needed education to be a pediatrician which is a medical doctor. Nurse practitioners (also referred to as advanced practice nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their specialty. For example, a pediatric NP has advanced education, skills, and training in caring for infants, children, and teens. Licensed as nurse practitioners and registered nurses, NPs follow the rules and regulations of the Nurse Practice Act of the state where they work. If accredited through the national board exam, the NP will have an additional credential such as Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (CPNP) or Certified Family Nurse Practitioner (CFNP). In addition, they have different tracks of education. The physician is trained in the medical model, and the nurse practitioner in the nursing model.

How many years of schooling are needed to become a family nurse practitioner?

The three major educational paths to registered nursing are a bachelor's degree, an associate degree, and a diploma from an approved nursing program. Nurses most commonly enter the occupation by completing an associate degree or bachelor's degree program. Individuals then must complete a national licensing examination in order to obtain a nursing license. Further training or education can qualify nurses to work in specialty areas, and may help improve advancement opportunities. Education and training. There are three major educational paths to registered nursing-a bachelor's of science degree in nursing (BSN), an associate degree in nursing (ADN), and a diploma. BSN programs, offered by colleges and universities, take about 4 years to complete. In 2006, 709 nursing programs offered degrees at the bachelor's level. ADN programs, offered by community and junior colleges, take about 2 to 3 years to complete. About 850 RN programs granted associate degrees. Diploma programs, administered in hospitals, last about 3 years. Only about 70 programs offered diplomas. Generally, licensed graduates of any of the three types of educational programs qualify for entry-level positions. Many RNs with an ADN or diploma later enter bachelor's programs to prepare for a broader scope of nursing practice. Often, they can find an entry-level position and then take advantage of tuition reimbursement benefits to work toward a BSN by completing an RN-to-BSN program. In 2006, there were 629 RN-to-BSN programs in the United States. Accelerated master's degree in nursing (MSN) programs also are available by combining 1 year of an accelerated BSN program with 2 years of graduate study. In 2006, there were 149 RN-to-MSN programs. Accelerated BSN programs also are available for individuals who have a bachelor's or higher degree in another field and who are interested in moving into nursing. In 2006, 197 of these programs were available. Accelerated BSN programs last 12 to 18 months and provide the fastest route to a BSN for individuals who already hold a degree. MSN programs also are available for individuals who hold a bachelor's or higher degree in another field. Individuals considering nursing should carefully weigh the advantages and disadvantages of enrolling in a BSN or MSN program because, if they do, their advancement opportunities usually are broader. In fact, some career paths are open only to nurses with a bachelor's or master's degree. A bachelor's degree often is necessary for administrative positions and is a prerequisite for admission to graduate nursing programs in research, consulting, and teaching, and all four advanced practice nursing specialties-clinical nurse specialists, nurse anesthetists, nurse-midwives, and nurse practitioners. Individuals who complete a bachelor's receive more training in areas such as communication, leadership, and critical thinking, all of which are becoming more important as nursing care becomes more complex. Additionally, bachelor's degree programs offer more clinical experience in nonhospital settings. Education beyond a bachelor's degree can also help students looking to enter certain fields or increase advancement opportunities. In 2006, 448 nursing schools offered master's degrees, 108 offered doctoral degrees, and 58 offered accelerated BSN-to-doctoral programs. All four advanced practice nursing specialties require at least a master's degree. Most programs include about 2 years of full-time study and require a BSN degree for entry; some programs require at least 1 to 2 years of clinical experience as an RN for admission. In 2006, there were 342 master's and post-master's programs offered for nurse practitioners, 230 master's and post-master's programs for clinical nurse specialists, 106 programs for nurse anesthetists, and 39 programs for nurse-midwives. All nursing education programs include classroom instruction and supervised clinical experience in hospitals and other health care facilities. Students take courses in anatomy, physiology, microbiology, chemistry, nutrition, psychology and other behavioral sciences, and nursing. Coursework also includes the liberal arts for ADN and BSN students. Supervised clinical experience is provided in hospital departments such as pediatrics, psychiatry, maternity, and surgery. A growing number of programs include clinical experience in nursing care facilities, public health departments, home health agencies, and ambulatory clinics. Licensure and certification. In all States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories, students must graduate from an approved nursing program and pass a national licensing examination, known as the NCLEX-RN, in order to obtain a nursing license. Nurses may be licensed in more than one State, either by examination or by the endorsement of a license issued by another State. The Nurse Licensure Compact Agreement allows a nurse who is licensed and permanently resides in one of the member States to practice in the other member States without obtaining additional licensure. In 2006, 20 states were members of the Compact, while 2 more were pending membership. All States require periodic renewal of licenses, which may require continuing education. Certification is common, and sometimes required, for the four advanced practice nursing specialties-clinical nurse specialists, nurse anesthetists, nurse-midwives, and nurse practitioners. Upon completion of their educational programs, most advanced practice nurses become nationally certified in their area of specialty. Certification also is available in specialty areas for all nurses. In some States, certification in a specialty is required in order to practice that specialty. Foreign-educated and foreign-born nurses wishing to work in the United States must obtain a work visa. To obtain the visa, nurses must undergo a federal screening program to ensure that their education and licensure are comparable to that of a U.S. educated nurse, that they have proficiency in written and spoken English, and that they have passed either the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS) Qualifying Examination or the NCLEX-RN. CGFNS administers the VisaScreen Program. (The Commission is an immigration-neutral, nonprofit organization that is recognized internationally as an authority on credentials evaluation in the health care field.) Nurses educated in Australia, Canada (except Quebec), Ireland, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom, or foreign-born nurses who were educated in the United States, are exempt from the language proficiency testing. In addition to these national requirements, foreign-born nurses must obtain state licensure in order to practice in the United States. Each State has its own requirements for licensure. Other qualifications. Nurses should be caring, sympathetic, responsible, and detail oriented. They must be able to direct or supervise others, correctly assess patients' conditions, and determine when consultation is required. They need emotional stability to cope with human suffering, emergencies, and other stresses. Advancement. Some RNs start their careers as licensed practical nurses or nursing aides, and then go back to school to receive their RN degree. Most RNs begin as staff nurses in hospitals, and with experience and good performance often move to other settings or are promoted to more responsible positions. In management, nurses can advance from assistant unit manger or head nurse to more senior-level administrative roles of assistant director, director, vice president, or chief nurse. Increasingly, management-level nursing positions require a graduate or an advanced degree in nursing or health services administration. Administrative positions require leadership, communication and negotiation skills, and good judgment. Some nurses move into the business side of health care. Their nursing expertise and experience on a health care team equip them to manage ambulatory, acute, home-based, and chronic care. Employers-including hospitals, insurance companies, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and managed care organizations, among others-need RNs for health planning and development, marketing, consulting, policy development, and quality assurance. Other nurses work as college and university faculty or conduct research. For the source and more detailed information concerning this subject, click on the related links section indicated below.

What does a family practitioner do?

I'm an MA in a family practice setting...Family doctors can care for and treat people of all ages. Basically your whole family can go there. A family doctor though is usually not a specialists, and so if you are diagnosed with a special condition or disease you will probably be sent to a specialists if it is out of the doctors scope of practice. Family practitioners can basically care for you from birth to death. They are very ideal for families...no driving to several different doctors when all in the family can see one. They receive the same basic training as specialists, except they don't go on to specialize in any one form of medical care such as cardiology, ob/gyn, or pediatrics...they can treat the bases of all conditions.

What are the duties of a family physician?

A family physician has many duties. They are the doctors whichpeople see on the most regular basis for routine checkups. Familyphysicians are also the first line in evaluating new conditionsbefore referring their patient to a specialist when needed.

Who is a scholar-practitioner?

A scholar is a high educated (with a University degree, better will be a PhD ( philosophiæ doctor )) person and his or her life is surrounded by constant research, You may call a scholar to a specialist in a given branch of knowledge.

How much money does a family nurse practitioner make?

The nurse practitioner (NP), to be clear, is the highest-level of nurse. An NP may diagnose and prescribe, just like a physician (though only under a physician's guidance, control and oversight). The physician needn't be physically present, though; and so that's why many NPs are placed in free and rural clinics, or in nursing homes, etc. The salary depends on several factors, including years of experience, and location. Obviously, an NP in Mooseballs, Montana is going to earn less than one in San Francsico or New York. The national range, though, by and large, goes from around $80,000 per year to around $105,000 per year; with the national median being around $90,000 per year. But, again, location and years of experience can manifestly affect those numbers.

What is the educational background for family practitioner?

The common path to practicing as a physician requires 8 years of education beyond high school and 3 to 8 additional years of internship and residency. All States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories license physicians.. Education and training. Formal education and training requirements for physicians are among the most demanding of any occupation-4 years of undergraduate school, 4 years of medical school, and 3 to 8 years of internship and residency, depending on the specialty selected. A few medical schools offer combined undergraduate and medical school programs that last 6 years rather than the customary 8 years.. Premedical students must complete undergraduate work in physics, biology, mathematics, English, and inorganic and organic chemistry. Students also take courses in the humanities and the social sciences. Some students volunteer at local hospitals or clinics to gain practical experience in the health professions.. The minimum educational requirement for entry into medical school is 3 years of college; most applicants, however, have at least a bachelor's degree, and many have advanced degrees. There are 146 medical schools in the United States-126 teach allopathic medicine and award a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree; 20 teach osteopathic medicine and award the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree.. Acceptance to medical school is highly competitive. Applicants must submit transcripts, scores from the Medical College Admission Test, and letters of recommendation. Schools also consider an applicant's character, personality, leadership qualities, and participation in extracurricular activities. Most schools require an interview with members of the admissions committee.. Students spend most of the first 2 years of medical school in laboratories and classrooms, taking courses such as anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology, psychology, microbiology, pathology, medical ethics, and laws governing medicine. They also learn to take medical histories, examine patients, and diagnose illnesses. During their last 2 years, students work with patients under the supervision of experienced physicians in hospitals and clinics, learning acute, chronic, preventive, and rehabilitative care. Through rotations in internal medicine, family practice, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry, and surgery, they gain experience in the diagnosis and treatment of illness.. Following medical school, almost all M.D.s enter a residency-graduate medical education in a specialty that takes the form of paid on-the-job training, usually in a hospital. Most D.O.s serve a 12-month rotating internship after graduation and before entering a residency, which may last 2 to 6 years.. A physician's training is costly. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, in 2004 more than 80 percent of medical school graduates were in debt for educational expenses.. Licensure and certification. All States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories license physicians. To be licensed, physicians must graduate from an accredited medical school, pass a licensing examination, and complete 1 to 7 years of graduate medical education. Although physicians licensed in one State usually can get a license to practice in another without further examination, some States limit reciprocity. Graduates of foreign medical schools generally can qualify for licensure after passing an examination and completing a U.S. residency.. M.D.s and D.O.s seeking board certification in a specialty may spend up to 7 years in residency training, depending on the specialty. A final examination immediately after residency or after 1 or 2 years of practice also is necessary for certification by a member board of the American Board of Medical Specialists (ABMS) or the American Osteopathic Association (AOA). The ABMS represents 24 boards related to medical specialties ranging from allergy and immunology to urology. The AOA has approved 18 specialty boards, ranging from anesthesiology to surgery. For certification in a subspecialty, physicians usually need another 1 to 2 years of residency.. Other qualifications. People who wish to become physicians must have a desire to serve patients, be self-motivated, and be able to survive the pressures and long hours of medical education and practice. Physicians also must have a good bedside manner, emotional stability, and the ability to make decisions in emergencies. Prospective physicians must be willing to study throughout their career to keep up with medical advances.. Advancement. Some physicians and surgeons advance by gaining expertise in specialties and subspecialties and by developing a reputation for excellence among their peers and patients. Many physicians and surgeons start their own practice or join a group practice. Others teach residents and other new doctors, and some advance to supervisory and managerial roles in hospitals, clinics, and other settings.. For the source and more detailed information concerning this subject, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated below this answer box.

What is the educational background for a family practitioner?

While many individuals who pursue a career as a physician major in biology at the undergraduate level, many others come from a variety of other educational backgrounds. You should meet with a career counselor at the college or university you attend for what options exist for you. The important issue is preparing for the appropriate prerequisites required for medical school. The student should have a strong background in the following areas. . Biology ( cell biology , biology of the organism) . Chemistry (inorganic, organic) . Physics . Communication (written and oral) . Higher level math's . Computer literacy . Development of good critical thinking skills. . Read the following carefully, and follow through on the link provided for detailed information from and according to the U.S. Department of Labor. After reading the below, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated below this answer box for more detailed information.. The common path to practicing as a physician requires 8 years of education beyond high school and 3 to 8 additional years of internship and residency. All States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories license physicians.. Education and training. Formal education and training requirements for physicians are among the most demanding of any occupation-4 years of undergraduate school, 4 years of medical school, and 3 to 8 years of internship and residency, depending on the specialty selected. A few medical schools offer combined undergraduate and medical school programs that last 6 years rather than the customary 8 years.. Premedical students must complete undergraduate work in physics, biology, mathematics, English, and inorganic and organic chemistry. Students also take courses in the humanities and the social sciences. Some students volunteer at local hospitals or clinics to gain practical experience in the health professions.. The minimum educational requirement for entry into medical school is 3 years of college; most applicants, however, have at least a bachelor's degree, and many have advanced degrees. There are 146 medical schools in the United States-126 teach allopathic medicine and award a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree; 20 teach osteopathic medicine and award the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree.. Acceptance to medical school is highly competitive. Applicants must submit transcripts, scores from the Medical College Admission Test, and letters of recommendation. Schools also consider an applicant's character, personality, leadership qualities, and participation in extracurricular activities. Most schools require an interview with members of the admissions committee.. Students spend most of the first 2 years of medical school in laboratories and classrooms, taking courses such as anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology, psychology, microbiology, pathology, medical ethics, and laws governing medicine. They also learn to take medical histories, examine patients, and diagnose illnesses. During their last 2 years, students work with patients under the supervision of experienced physicians in hospitals and clinics, learning acute, chronic, preventive, and rehabilitative care. Through rotations in internal medicine, family practice, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry, and surgery, they gain experience in the diagnosis and treatment of illness.. Following medical school, almost all M.D.s enter a residency-graduate medical education in a specialty that takes the form of paid on-the-job training, usually in a hospital. Most D.O.s serve a 12-month rotating internship after graduation and before entering a residency, which may last 2 to 6 years.. A physician's training is costly. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, in 2004 more than 80 percent of medical school graduates were in debt for educational expenses.. Licensure and certification. All States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories license physicians. To be licensed, physicians must graduate from an accredited medical school, pass a licensing examination, and complete 1 to 7 years of graduate medical education. Although physicians licensed in one State usually can get a license to practice in another without further examination, some States limit reciprocity. Graduates of foreign medical schools generally can qualify for licensure after passing an examination and completing a U.S. residency.. M.D.s and D.O.s seeking board certification in a specialty may spend up to 7 years in residency training, depending on the specialty. A final examination immediately after residency or after 1 or 2 years of practice also is necessary for certification by a member board of the American Board of Medical Specialists (ABMS) or the American Osteopathic Association (AOA). The ABMS represents 24 boards related to medical specialties ranging from allergy and immunology to urology. The AOA has approved 18 specialty boards, ranging from anesthesiology to surgery. For certification in a subspecialty, physicians usually need another 1 to 2 years of residency.. Other qualifications. People who wish to become physicians must have a desire to serve patients, be self-motivated, and be able to survive the pressures and long hours of medical education and practice. Physicians also must have a good bedside manner, emotional stability, and the ability to make decisions in emergencies. Prospective physicians must be willing to study throughout their career to keep up with medical advances.. Advancement. Some physicians and surgeons advance by gaining expertise in specialties and subspecialties and by developing a reputation for excellence among their peers and patients. Many physicians and surgeons start their own practice or join a group practice. Others teach residents and other new doctors, and some advance to supervisory and managerial roles in hospitals, clinics, and other settings.. For the source and more detailed information concerning this request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated below this answer box.

Average salary for family practitioner?

Annual income for all family practitioners generally ranges from just under $100,000 to $250,000 a year or more . This can change if u own ur own clinic or if u are working for the government also, the lowest can go down to 65,000 a year whereas the highest can go upto 300,000 as well Hope this helped :)

What does a family nurse practitioner do?

Nurse Practitioners treat both acute and chronic conditions through comprehensive history taking, physical exams, physical therapy, ordering tests and therapies for patients, within their scope of practice. NPs can serve as a patient's "point of entry" health care provider, and see patients of all ages depending on their designated scope of practice. (Wikipedia). For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (Wikipedia) indicated directly below this answer section. . Nurse Practitioners treat both acute and chronic conditions through comprehensive history taking, physical exams, physical therapy, ordering tests and therapies for patients, within their scope of practice. NPs can serve as a patient's "point of entry" health care provider, and see patients of all ages depending on their designated scope of practice. (Wikipedia). For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (Wikipedia) indicated directly below this answer section. . Nurse Practitioners treat both acute and chronic conditions through comprehensive history taking, physical exams, physical therapy, ordering tests and therapies for patients, within their scope of practice. NPs can serve as a patient's "point of entry" health care provider, and see patients of all ages depending on their designated scope of practice. (Wikipedia). For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (Wikipedia) indicated directly below this answer section. . Nurse Practitioners treat both acute and chronic conditions through comprehensive history taking, physical exams, physical therapy, ordering tests and therapies for patients, within their scope of practice. NPs can serve as a patient's "point of entry" health care provider, and see patients of all ages depending on their designated scope of practice. (Wikipedia). For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (Wikipedia) indicated directly below this answer section. . Nurse Practitioners treat both acute and chronic conditions through comprehensive history taking, physical exams, physical therapy, ordering tests and therapies for patients, within their scope of practice. NPs can serve as a patient's "point of entry" health care provider, and see patients of all ages depending on their designated scope of practice. (Wikipedia). For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (Wikipedia) indicated directly below this answer section. . Nurse Practitioners treat both acute and chronic conditions through comprehensive history taking, physical exams, physical therapy, ordering tests and therapies for patients, within their scope of practice. NPs can serve as a patient's "point of entry" health care provider, and see patients of all ages depending on their designated scope of practice. (Wikipedia). For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (Wikipedia) indicated directly below this answer section.

What are the goal of the American Association of family practitioners?

To represent family medicine residency program directors at a national level and provide a political voice for them in appropriate means. . To develop the art and science of resident education in family medicine. . To improve the quality of education of family physicians. . To promote ethical behavior is all aspects of residency operation. . To promote communication and cooperation between family medicine residency programs and other members of the family medicine family. . To provide a network for mutual assistance among family medicine residency directors. . To enhance the administrative operation of family medicine residencies.

What are shipping practitioners?

a practitioner is a person who have mastered a comprehensive knowledge of a certain displine, say medicine, IT etc. Hence a shipping practioner is one who is knowledgeable and professional in sipping operations. These may be consultancy or Shipping agencies.

What is The scope of family nurse practitioner with someone who has psychiatric condition?

Not enough information is included in the question with which to answer. What is the N.P.'s medical specialty, if any? Is the N.P. in solo practice, or operating under the supervision of an M.D.? Bottom line: If the N.P. is not schooled in dealing with psychiatric or psychological disorders they should not be treating them beyond their level of medical expertise.

What is database practitioners?

Computer Science Professionals those who design, manage, maintain & develop Databases (Information Storage Houses) are Database Practitioners. The roles of Database Practitioners are well diversified such as Database Administrators, Database Analyst, Database Designers (Database Modelling) etc.

Is Family Guy cleaner than Call of Duty?

If by "cleaner" you mean content, sex, violence, that sort ofthing. You can't exactly compare the 2 since ones an animated TV show andthe other is an console/online video game. Having never played Call of Duty, I would suspect the video gamewould be "cleaner" but when you throw in the language of onlineplayers it could go from PG13 to a hard R rather quickly.

What educational background does the physician need to be a family practitioner?

The general practitioner must take four years of pre-med studies at a university. Then he or she must go to medical school, then become an intern and resident. Once he or she is approved for the general practitioner program at the medical school there is a specialty study or on the job program to go through. It is a shorter program than say a neurology program (that alone can be five years just for that). Then the person must past the boards, state licensing and then can become a general practitioner. See web sites on university web sites and medical school web sites for exact specifics on requirements. You can save money on training by going to the Armed Forces University. You will be required to serve for a certain amount of years but it is fully certified and licensed and way cheaper than paying over a hundred thousand dollars for education loans.

What do insolvency practitioners do?

Insolvency practitioners step in when a person company or the like can no longer meet their current financial obligations and are going into debt or will lose their business. Insolvency Practitioners must be licensed in their field.

What is an insolvency practitioners?

Insolvency practitioners are individuals who act as a "go-between" for people going through bankruptcy and their creditors, helping the process move along smoothly and making sure the debts are paid fairly. It is a job found exclusively in the United Kingdom.

What are the duties of a single parent family?

There are very possibly societies where duties are owed by a family, but Western society of today is not one of them. A family is not considered a unit which owes duties or gets rewards, only the individuals in it. In particular, in our society, we do not have a concept of "filial duty" owed by children to their parents, only "parental duties" owed by parents to their children, and these duties are the same, no matter how many parents a child has (with divorce and step-parents, it could be as many as four): the parent has the duty to feed and clothe the child, to provide for his or her every want, to provide educational opportunities, and supervised recreation, and to keep the child safe from every possible situation where he or she might be harmed or hurt.

What duties does a nurse practitioner have?

A nurse practitioner's duty is to take detailed medical histories and perform complete physical exams. They also provide diagnoses, prescriptions, and treat common illnesses.

What kind of education does a family nurse practitioner have?

Family nurse practitioners have education starting from registered nurse and moving to advanced registered nurse. They must have a master degree in Registered nursing then a practical registered nurse before can become a nursing practitioner.

How can one become family practitioner?

In the United States, an individual desiring a career as a family practitioner must first complete a 4-year program at a college or university, resulting in the earning of a B.S. or B.A. degree. Coursework should include a strong emphasis in the sciences, such as biology or chemistry.Following completion of this degree, four additional years of undergraduate medical education must be completed at an approved medical school, resulting in the earning of doctor of medicine (M.D.) degree. Upon graduation, new M.D's enter a residency program in family medicine that typically lasts around 3 years, under the supervision of experienced professionals, before becoming family practitioners.